climate-change

The in-depth levels of global oceans, which earlier were believed to be less affected by global warming and climate change, have now proved to be no exceptional case. A new study, conducted for exploring the impact of climate change on aquatic ecology has detected that global ocean oxygen level has dropped down by 2% in last 57 years, which is quite shocking for the ecologists.

The report, published in an influential science journal has highlighted how the impacts of climate change have been intensifying over the year, affecting both the land-based ecology and marine lives. The research paper appeared in the science journal ‘Nature’ on 15th of this month has emphasised on the devastating impacts of climate change on marine biology. As per the study, in last six decades, the level of oceanic oxygen level has kept on going down globally and in 57 years, the oxygen altitude has declined by 2%.

The impact of the changing climatic patterns on marine life, ecology, and the natural system has been a matter of concerns since long, and the new study has come up with a precise answer to this long-predicted concern. Alongside the past declining rate, the researchers also have highlighted that, by 2100, the rate will be triple. According to the paper published in the journal Nature, by 2100, the level of dissolved oxygen in the ocean will be dropped down by 7%, creating a significant threat to the marine ecosystem.

In the research paper, the scientists also warned that, if the speed on which the climatic patterns are being changed will go on, then soon, the entire marine ecology will be under threat of extinction. The analysts are also expecting much severe and destructive consequences of this declining oxygen level for the aquatic lives.

The study was carried out by the oceanographer Sunke Schmidtko and his two colleagues from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research in Kiel, Germany. According to the statistics, between 1960 and 2010, the level of dissolved oxygen in oceans has trimmed down by 2% down to climate change and rising temperature level.